ndert2
Follow us on Facebook

Latest Comments

ND Outdoors Sites

FishingBuddy
NoDakOutdoors

Featured Link

Meanwhile

Login Form



Support NorthDecoder

Search This Site

Loading

Amazon Search Widget

Feature Stories

Personal
The Low Road

Amazon Search

JoomlaWatch 1.2.12 - Joomla Monitor and Live Stats by Matej Koval
Why I am still proud to be a North Dakotan
Written by Adam   

I can say that my senator is Byron Dorgan. 

Months ago, I republished a blog post written by Mark Sumner, a contributing editor over at DailyKos on this site that gave the best description I have yet to hear about why our economy did what it did.  A brief explanation is that in 1999 we passed a law that repealed the post-depression regulations that prevented banks, investment banks, and insurance companies from merging together and taking on excessive risk.  It also allowed more banks to fall into the catergory of "too big to fail."  The original post on DailyKos is here.  If you didn't read it then, read it now.

What does any of this have to do with our Junior Senator?  Well, when "nobody could have seen this coming,"  Dorgan did.  And he said something about it.  In 1999.  Here is his speech on the Senate floor in opposition to the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act:

I have had not had the opportunity to watch the actual video in its entirety, but I want to lift a couple of paragraphs from the transcript(which I did read from start to finish) that I think are quite prescient and frighteninly predictive:

I begin by reading an article that appeared in the Wall Street Journal, November 16, 1998. This is a harbinger of things to come, just as something I will read that happened in 1994 is a harbinger of things to come, especially as we move in this direction of modernization.

It was Aug. 21, a sultry Friday, and nearly half the partners at Long-Term Capital Management LP [that's LTCM, a company] were out of the office. Outside the fund's glass-and-granite headquarters, a fountain languidly streamed over a copper osprey clawing its prey.

Inside, the associates logged on to their computers and saw something deeply disturbing: U.S. Treasurys were skyrocketing, throwing their relationship to other securities out of whack. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was swooning--by noon, down 283 points. The European bond market was in shambles. LTCM's biggest bets were blowing up, and no one could do anything about it.

This was a private hedge funding.

By 11 a.m., the [hedge] fund had lost $150 million in a wager on the prices of two telecommunications stocks involved in a takeover. Then, a single bet tied to the U.S. bond market lost $100 million [by the same company]. Another $100 million evaporated in a similar trade in Britain. By day's end, LTCM [this hedge fund in New York] had hemorrhaged half a billion dollars. Its equity had sunk to $3.1 billion--down a third for the year.

This company had made bets over $1 trillion.

Now, what happened? They lost their silk shirts. But of course, they were saved because a Federal Reserve Board official decided we can't lose a hedge fund like this; it would be catastrophic to the marketplace. So on Sunday night they convened a meeting with an official of the Federal Reserve Board, and a group of banks came in as a result of that meeting and used bank funds to shore up a private hedge fund that was capitalized in the Caymen Islands for the purpose, I assume, of avoiding taxes. Bets of over $1 trillion in hedges--they could have set up a casino in their lobby, in my judgment, the way they were doing business. But they got bailed out.

This was massive exposure. The exposure on the hedge fund was such that the failure of the hedge fund would have had a significant impact on the market.

And so we modernize our banking system. This is unregulated. This isn't a bank; it is an unregulated hedge fund, except the banks have massive quantities of money in the hedge fund now in order to bail it out.

What does modernization say about this? Nothing, nothing. It says let's pretend this doesn't exist, this isn't a problem, let's not deal with it.

...

So we will modernize our financial institutions and we will say about this problem--nothing? Don't worry about it?

We have folks outside who have worked on this very hard and who very much want this to happen. We have a lot of folks in here who are very compliant to say: Absolutely, let me be the lead singer. And here we are. We have this bill, which I will bet, in 5, 10, 15 years from now, we will be back thinking of this bill like we thought of the bill passed in the late 1970s and early 1980s, in which this Congress unhitched the savings and loans so some sleepy little Texas institution could gather brokered deposits from all around America and, like a giant rocket, become a huge enterprise. And guess what. With all the speculation in the S&Ls and brokered deposits and all the things that went with it that this Congress allowed, what did it cost the American taxpayer to bail out that bunch of failures? What did it cost? Hundreds of billions of dollars. I will bet one day somebody is going to look back at this and they are going to say: How on Earth could we have thought it made sense to allow the banking industry to concentrate, through merger and acquisition, to become bigger and bigger and bigger; far more firms in the category of too big to fail? How did we think that was going to help this country? Then to decide we shall fuse it with inherently risky enterprises, how did we think that was going to avoid the lessons of the past?

Senator Dorgan was of course, dead on.  That is precisely what happened.  AIG opened up a derivatives division, which ultimately lead to the company's failure and the Federal Reserve's takeover of the institution.   Citgroup invested in derivatives, and is teetering on the edge of collapse.  Bear Stearns bought up derivatives, and failed.  The list goes on and on.  To compound the problems with Gramm-Leach-Bliley, the Bush Administration came to town and told Wall Street, "do whatever you think is best, we will make it a point to not regulate your actions."  Amazingly, with no oversight, the institutions made bets that they couldn't cover, and risks they couldn't handle, and the house of cards came crashing down.  

Unfortunately, many of the people that are on the President's economic team were the people outside that Senator Dorgan referred to that "worked very har" on Gramm-Leach-Bliley.  

Larry Summers, the Secretary of the Treasury at the time, and one of the principal architects of the bill is now the President's principal economic advisor(to name one example).  

What needs to be done?  That is the prescient question.  Here is Dorgan on Rachel Maddow's show last month.

We do need to figure out where the banks sit and begin to unravel them.  Most importantly, we need to do two things:

Repeal the Gramm-Leach-Bliley act.  This horrid piece of legislation is the principal cause of the problem.

Second, derivatives need to be regulated in a similar manner as any other security.  I would actually be interested in banning a large number of derivatives contracts.  a derivative is essentially a bet.  The most well-known and understood are stock options, which are bets on the future price of a stock.  It can be a bet on anything, though.  They can be on baseball scores if you want them to be.  there should be sensible regulations on what derivatives are based on, and the companies that sell them may not provide other, more secure investments(like savings accounts, bonds, etc.)  that way we can keep the massive risks associated with these securities contained to the institutions that sell them, and those that buy them, which will allow the rest of us to operate without the systemic risk that was placed in the financial system.

We need to do a lot more, but I know one person I want to have at the table in those discussions: Senator Dorgan.

 
Behind Closed Doors: Where ND Republican Legislators Assault Democracy
Written by Chet   

 Some of you may recall that during the last North Dakota legislative session (in 2007), a few realtor legislators came up with a plan to line their own pockets by having the State sell land currently part of the Missouri River Correctional Center (MRCC) to have it developed into low-lying, flood-plain river-front property. They tried to do it all under the guise of improving the North Dakota state penitentiary facility, even though nobody, ever -- in any of the studies the state had paid hundreds of thousands of dollars to conduct -- had suggested there was a reason to include the moving of the MRCC as part of any immediate plan.  I wrote about their scheme back then (click here and click here).

Two years ago, an editorial in the Fargo For'em had this to say about the scheme:

A cynic might conclude the curious push for a prison that prison managers and the governor don’t want has more to do with building contracts and land speculation than upgrading corrections buildings. A lot more is up for grabs in an $85 million project than the governor’s more-than-adequate $42 million cell house replacement.

Fargo For'em

The cynic at the Forum was right (for once).  The plan was halted.  It turned into an "interim committee study."  It had been studied three or four times before at a cost of hundreds of thousands of dollars, but they hadn't gotten the answer they wanted so they spent another couple hundred thousand dollars.  From the latest study, here's everything you'll ever need to know about the MRCC:

The Missouri River Correctional Center is located eight miles south of Bismarck near the Missouri River. The Missouri River Correctional Center has no barriers to contain the inmates and is located in a wooded setting. The institution houses male inmates whose sentences are not less than 30 days nor more than one year. The inmate housing facilities at MRCC consist of a minimum security, dormitory-style housing unit for male inmates which has a capacity of 150 inmates. Among the education programs offered to the inmates at MRCC are a high school equivalency program, a resident tutoring program, a business education class, an automotive mechanics program, carpentry classes, computer skills training, and prerelease and education release programs.

[ ]

The site is owned by the state, zoned for public use, and consists of over 985 acres. The site contains 121.4 acres of wetlands and 905 acres in the floodplain. Existing environmental constraints include the Missouri River 100-year and 500-year floodplains, freshwater wetlands, and a potential habitat for endangered species. Existing utilities include a six-inch waterline, an onsite sewer pumping station and three-inch force main to Bismarck's system, three-phase electrical power, and a four-inch natural gas line.

CFRC Final Report (pp. 88 and 90)

Based upon the recommendations of the interim committee, a bill was proposed in the North Dakota Senate at the beginning of the current legislative session.  Senate Bill 2030 (SB2030) was introduced on January 6, 2009.  The proposal was pretty much in line with what the Governor had proposed four years or so ago (back when construction costs were much lower).  The 2009 Senate bill was assigned to the Senate Appropriations Committee and a hearing was held, with a chance for public input, on January 26, 2009.  On February 17, 2009, the bill came out of committee with some amendments and a "do pass" recommendation.  The full Senate voted on the bill, as amended, on February 19, 2009, it passed and was messaged over to the House.  On February 26th the bill had its first reading and was assigned to House Appropriations.  A hearing was held on March 2, 2009, the committee took testimony and the public was allowed to comment on the bill.  

Up to this point, there was no sign that the legislature would propose that the MRCC be moved and the land sold by realtor-legislators at any time in the near future.  There was mention by the interim committee of the possible sale during a "phase 3" of the project, which might have been 20 or 30 years from now.

Last week Friday, April 3, 2009, an amendment to SB2030 mysteriously appeared.  Without any public input or hearing, the committee tacked on an amendment to the bill calling for the building of a new MRCC facility to the penitentiary land, calling for the expenditure of $6 million dollars for the project, and suggesting that the MRCC land would be sold two years from now.  The current version of SB2030 (as amended) has come out of the House Appropriations Committee with a 15 to 8 "do pass" recommendation.  I have no idea how that vote breaks down.  For all I know, it could be that all the Democrats supported the amendments, and just 8 Republicans who opposed it.  Maybe I'll find that out later.  We'll see.

Next stop?  The House floor.

If the amendment is approved and the bill passes on the House floor, the next step is for a "conference committee" consisting of members of the House and the Senate to meet to work out the differences between the two bills.  There will be no opportunity for public testimony or input.  The public will NEVER get a chance to provide its input on the proposed expenditure of $6 million t move the MRCC from it's current, perfectly-good location.  

This assault on good policy has taken place -- like most of the violence perpetrated by legislators upon the citizens of North Dakota -- behind closed doors.   It will have taken place behind closed doors after hundreds of thousands of dollars have been spent on consultants, with none of them saying we should move the MRCC now and put the land on the auction block.

By using the secretive, behind-closed-door method the realtor-legislators have chosen to use, they have essentially said to us, the citizens, "This is an unfortunate private matter.  We are working it out."  

But we've seen this before.  They've done this to us before.  They assault our best interests, they apologize and beg us to take them back,  we forgive them and they come back, only to do it to us again.  It's the cycle of abusive policy violence.  

It is not a private matter.

It's an assault on the citizens of North Dakota by a few money-hungry legislators.  This is a violent attack on good policy.  Our legislature should not go spending $6 million dollars on one unnecessary project so that they can line the pockets of a few of their realtor-legislator friends and comrades.  They should not skulk around behind closed doors making these changes to law.  They should have to look us in the eye if they want to try to beat us around like this.  They should not turn hundreds of acres of low-lying land into soon-to-be-flood-plain-victim McMansions, teeth kicking the experts who've said it's not necessary to move the MRCC facility at all.

We do not deserve this kind of abuse from the people we elected.  We deserve to be treated with dignity and respect.

We deserve better.

 
Long Overdue Sunday Diversion: Billy Joel
Written by Chet   

Scenes from an Italian Restaurant

By request...

 
Ridiculous North Dakota "Personhood" Bill Fails
Written by Chet   

The North Dakota Senate, today, killed the ridiculous bill promoted by the likes of fringe right-wing magazine publisher, Steve Cates.  It was the so-called "personhood" bill, House Bill 1572.  It would have made it a crime for a doctor to treat an ectopic or molar pregnancy, and would have made it a crime to freeze a fertilized embryo for later use.  The bill is gone.  Good riddance. (Click here for the BisTrib story .)

I still can't believe anybody voted for this bill on the House side, let alone a majority. 

For some reason the word "cavemen" just popped into my mind.  

And speaking of cavemen, fifty-two members of the North Dakota House of Representatives voted to put the words "except the gays" at the end of the sentence, "God loves all of his children."   The bill was SB 2278, and the cavemen caucus won on a vote of 34 to 54. It looks like it was fairly close to a party line vote.  Here's a breakdown of the vote.  (Click here)

Opponents said adding sexual orientation to the classes protected in the state Human Rights Act would protect a behavior not a characteristic.

Fargo Forum

I wonder how this vote breakdown compares to the House vote on HB1572.  I might have to look that up later. 

<sarcasm>  Thank goodness the North Dakota House Republicans are saving us from the gays.   </sarcasm>

 
Let's Nip This In The Bud
Written by Chet   

There's a list being circulated around the North Dakota internets that I really had a problem with as I read it.  I first saw it in a Facebook note, I've seen it in some e-mails and then later I saw it in someone else's comment here on NorthDecoder.com (click here).  Here's the list:

What we dont see with the flooding
Just a personal observation...as I watched the news coverage of the massive flooding in the Midwest with the levee's about to break in Fargo, ND, what amazed me is not what we saw, but what we didn't see... 
1. We don't see looting. 
2. We don't see street violence. 
3. We don't see people sitting on their rooftops waiting for the government to come and save them. 
4. We don't see people waiting on the government to do anything. 
5. We don't see Hollywood organizing benefits to raise money for people to rebuild. 
6. We don't see people blaming President Obama. (Except for Don Marchant, post #30) 
7. We don't see people ignoring evacuation orders. 
8. We don't see people blaming a government conspiracy to blow up the levees as the reason some have not held. 
9. We don't see the US Senators or the Governor of North Dakota crying on TV. 
10. We don't see the Mayors of any of these cities complaining about the lack of state or federal response. 
11. We don't see or hear reports of the police going around confiscating personal firearms so only the criminal will be armed. 
12. We don't see gangs of people going around and randomly shooting at the rescue workers. 
13. You don't see some leaders in this country blaming the bad behavior of the North Dakota flood victims on "society" (of course there is no wide spread reports! of lawlessness to require excuses).
 
NorthDecoder.com (it's waaay down in the comments)

I read that list and it really made me uncomfortable.  It's taken me a day or two to pinpoint what made me uncomfortable about it, but -- with the help from some friends -- I think I've got it figured out.  

I sent the list to Athenae, a friend I met at the DNC convention in Denver last summer.  Athenae writes for First-Draft.com.  I sent it to her because I knew she'd had some involvement in Hurricane Katrina relief.  I wanted to know what she thought about it.  She forwarded the list on to her co-blogger, Scout Prime, who was a little closer to the issue.  Scout has written a blog post about the list.  It's on First-Draft.com.  I've asked for her permission to cross-post her comments, and I''ve gotten the "go ahead."   Here's Scout's thoughts:

With each disaster there inevitably comes an email or blog comment like this (scroll down) comparing the new terrible event to Katrina and the flood of New Orleans and I doubt it will ever end.

[Editor:  I've edited out the list because I've got it, above.]

This was emailed to me for comment by Athenae and a blogger at North Decoder who was disturbed by it. At the end of this post I have posted my email response outlining the falsehoods contained above and if nothing else please read the last paragraph of it.

St-rita wheel chair

(St. Rita's/USA Today)

But for now I'm going to focus on another comment (scroll down further at above link) which is completely false:

Points well taken
But if there is a flood, and the levees don't hold, and the city gets flooded, I will bet that the staff of the nursing homes all leave the residents to die on their own either. Do you remember that? Everyone that works at the nursing home took off and left all the people there to die! You can make up excuses all day long for that type of behavior, but I am not buying it.

This is a falsehood. The staff stayed and helped. People don't realize when those levees broke the flood waters came in fast and furious. That nursing home was in St. Bernard Parish. A couple I interviewed were from St. B and they said their home was flooded in minutes. They barely escaped  with their lives...I mean literally. At one point the guy was almost swept away. He only lived because he grabbed the protruding  antenna of an already submerged truck. So imagine those waters sweeping into a nursing home and overwhelming elderly folks and the staff. If you can't imagine it, well here is an account of the horror:

"We were like in a sinking ship," says Gene Alonzo, a retired fisherman who stayed at St. Rita's to be with his disabled brother, Carlos, a resident. "I never did see water come up like that."

Within 20 minutes, the water inside rose almost to the ceiling and nearly three dozen residents were drowning, some in their beds, in one of the signature scenes of horror wrought by Katrina.

Alonzo's account of the ordeal, together with new details from government officials, survivors and the Manganos' attorney, James Cobb, paint the most complete picture so far of what happened at St. Rita's before and after Katrina struck — and shed light on why the Manganos did not evacuate.

Their descriptions also debunk some of the myths that grew out of the chaotic aftermath of the hurricane, including reports that the Manganos abandoned their nursing home during rescue efforts there.

SNIP

Alonzo, 55, says he put his 52-year-old brother onto a mattress, then grabbed Carlos' roommate, Harold Kurz. Alonzo recounts the frantic effort by nurses and others to save as many as possible:

"You can't get out a door, so they're kicking out windows to float the residents out on mattresses to put them on the roof. In every room, people were hollering. They were screaming like somebody was murdering them (and) ... for God to help them. It was a horror scene."

SNIP

Alonzo returned to St. Rita's a month after Katrina to get belongings from his ruined car. He calls the place haunted, and says he will never go back.

"Can you imagine being in your wheelchair ... and that water came up over your head? I guess that's why people are so mad."

He tears up, and then says quietly he wasn't strong enough to hold onto both his brother and Kurz. "You can't swim with two people. I had to let Harold go. I still think about that when I fall asleep."

That story is from USA Today in November of 2005. The truth was set forth over 3 years ago yet the falsehood remains.

I wish the people who wrote the above comments seen at North Decoder would have to spend one night falling asleep to the horrific screams filling their head and the sight of their hand letting a human life slip away, for I think just one night of that would put an end to their writing comments which perpetuate the  falsehoods....at least I hope

This is from an email response I sent regarding the 13 points. Feel free to add to it as it is certainly not a definitive rebuke, just thoughts off the top of my head based on the past 3+ years of research and writing about Katrina and the Federal Flood:

As for the 13 points.... 

Is 80% of Fargo under water at present? Is it flooded to the rooftops?  That was the case for much of NOLA and well you can't do much BUT go to the rooftop and hope help comes. 

Did 90% of Fargo evacuate? Because 90% of So LA did so. It was the largest and most successful evacuation in US history. Over 1 million people evacuated...most in just 24-48 hours. My God the whole population of the state of North Dakota (640,000) would have to evacuate  TWICE to make that argument meaningful. 

Very few people believed the levees were purposely blown up...and once the Army Corps of Engineers admitted it was their design failure that caused the levees to break it was even less. That admission occurred 6 months after Katrina struck....not one media outlet or newspaper reported it at that time other than those in New Orleans.  NOT. ONE. But for understanding those very few who still thought they were blown...there is a history of the levees having been blown  in the 1927 flooding.  Did the business folks of Fargo ever blow the levees in poor areas in order to save downtown businesses and wealthy neighborhoods anytime in the past century?  I assume no but if they had I suspect Fargo too would have a few folks questioning if it hadn't happened again. 

As for politicians crying.....Are their hundreds of dead bodies floating in the flood waters of Fargo?  Have over 1500 residents  died?  The majority of whom were elderly or disabled?  Because shit like that makes people cry and that is what was seen in NOLA. I remember a CNN reporter on  Day 1 of Katrina describing the horrors in the streets and she cried ...that was Jeane Meserve,  a seasoned veteran. She spoke of much including the screams of dogs caught in the power lines being fried to death.  People don't realize how horrible it  was. I interviewed a couple who had stayed and they talked of hearing God awful screams...they didn't know if it was human or animal or both. I spoke with another man who had been in NO who was haunted by those same kind of screams.  And well that is sad and horrible and evokes tears...to people who have empathy at least 

It is an ABSOLUTE falsehood that anyone ever shot at rescue workers or helicopters...It did not happen. Repeat---that is false. Media reported it and it was wrong and the National Guard  has said so. 

As for the federal governments involvement ....Are these folks familiar with the Stafford Act that calls for fed intervention when states are overwhelmed by a disaster. Orleans, Plaquemines and St Bernard Parish as well as a few others on the South LA coast were devastated or under water. I think this would be the equivalent of about 4 or  5 counties in North Dakota. Do you have that many counties under water? In St Bernard parish there were only 6 houses inhabitable after Katrina...just 6. The fishing  communities of that parish had been literally wiped off the map.  All of which is to say that disaster was massive in its scope and devastation...and no state could have handled it on their own...federal help was needed and accorded by law.

The local Fish and Wildlife folks were out rescuing people immediately. The Coast Guard as well and they were local folks who were flying over their own flooded homes. In St. Bernard Parish anyone with a boat got out there and plucked people off rooftops.There is a quote from Gov Blanco ...."When all the stories are told,  the story is going to be that Louisianans were saved by Louisianans." 


A final point...and believe me on this...the people of NOLA are right now incredibly sympathetic to your plight...they Know and they'd never judge given what they know
 

It's important to address this "list of 13" nonsense.  As noted above, it's everywhere.  E-mails.  Facebook.  A comment here.  If you google some of the sentences, you'll find the list all over the internet.  It's #37 in the 900-some comments posted under some great photos on the Boston Globe's website (click here), with many good and some bad comments afterwards.  

I could go through and challenge the accuracy of the points in the list, too.  I could point out that there has been some looting in Fargo/Moorhead.  I heard a news report a couple days ago about some guy stealing sandbags.   (Classy.)  If you go to YouTube and do a search for "coast guard fargo rescue" you'll find dozens of videos of people being rescued from their homes in the F/M area.  I could go on, but that's not a productive use of time.  

Natural disasters suck.  It's inspirational when communities pull together, neighbors helping neighbors.  Kudos to my friends, family and neighbors all over North Dakota; people who've busted their butts for the good of all.  North Dakotans and Louisianans are tough Americans who've been through a lot, like New Yorkers, Iowans, Californians and lots and lots of other hearty Americans.  'Nuff said.

The list of 13 is offensive, it's mean, it's inaccurate and it's not the kind of thing I'd expect to see from North Dakotans.  It's been around too long.  It deserves a swift death and a quiet funeral.

Now.

 
Public Disservice Announcement (II)
Written by Chet   

The Sky is FallingIf you took a "big picture" view of the handling of the flooding disasters in Fargo and Bismarck, most people would have to agree there have been some problems, but a fair amount of the work has been addressed competently by the city and county governments involved, by the National Guard soldiers and by the volunteers.  Most rational people would have to agree the areas not handled competently were handled VERY incompetently.  I could talk about what a great job the volunteers did.  I could talk about what a great bunch of neighbors we all have.  I could talk about the work of the National Guard, the Coast Guard and the Army Corps of Engineers.  I could talk about the amazing job KFGO in Fargo has done over the past week or so.  But I choose not to talk about those things.  At some point, someone is going to need to ask the question:  "What wasn't handled well? (so far)"  I pick me.  I pick now.  Consider this a "first installment."

First, these flooding events should be viewed as an opportunity for our state and local officials to take a look at what a dismal failure our wetlands and water management have been.   We would not be having major neighborhoods in towns like Linton, Beulah, Bismarck, Fargo and Devils Lake being overrun with water if we weren't eliminating all the pooling areas for water around our state and converting our landscape into a system of downhill express lanes for water.  I predict we'll soon have a "blue ribbon task force" appointed to whitewash the real problems our state has in water management.  Stay tuned.  

Second, I feel bad for the smaller towns dealing with the flooding problems.  With all of our state's resources being focused on Fargo and Bismarck, the folks in Beulah, Linton and a lot of smaller towns all over the state must feel like second-class citizens.

Third,  how 'bout a round of applause for North Dakota's Department of Emergency Services.  Twice in less than a week DES broadcast disaster announcements over at least some of North Dakota's radio and TV stations, telling us the sky was falling. The first incident was when DEC cut in to tell the citizens of Bismarck the northern ice jam on the Missouri River had broken and a wall of water was headed towards the south ice jam; all of south Bismarck should be evacuated.  This was simply untrue.  There were eye witnesses on the scene at Double Ditch, North of Bismarck, where the ice jam was located, and they were reporting to the radio news folks -- live, on air (I was listening) -- that the ice jam was not moving at all.  This false announcement created fear and panic, and was completely uncalled for.  Nobody has explained how and why this happened.

The second was the announcement last week Wednesday that the eastbound lanes of traffic on Interstate 94 between Jamestown and Fargo had been closed because they were preparing for the "voluntary evacuation of Fargo."  I'm told the eastbound lanes were closed, but they were closed because of/after the DES announcement was made.  There was, in fact, no "voluntary evacuation" of Fargo.  

I was listening to KFGO radio when DES cut in to announce the voluntary evacuation of Fargo.  It was quite dramatic.  It happened in the middle of a press conference where city officials were talking about what the City's plan was.  They made no mention of a "voluntary evacuation" at the meeting, and -- it seems -- knew nothing about a "voluntary evacuation."  When the disaster announcement finished, I listened to KFGO's news guy -- former state Senator Joel Heitkamp -- express his frustration with the conflicting messages.  

It's becoming more and more clear this second screw-up by the executive branch was caused by incompetence by someone under  Governor John Hoeven's control.  It's also fairly clear Hoeven was pressuring Fargo Mayor Dennis Walaker to evacuate the city.  

The closed-door meeting to talk about whether to do a large-scale evacuation took place at the height of Fargo’s flood battle late last week. The discussion became heated at times, with Fargo leaders striving to convince state and federal authorities the city’s defenses were sound, said Vice Mayor Tim Mahoney.

[ ]

Mahoney said the governor and FEMA wanted the city to strongly consider a large evacuation.

Don Canton, a spokesman for Hoeven, said state and federal officials met with Fargo leaders to evaluate the “advisability” of a citywide evacuation.

“I’m sure there was a discussion of mandatory evacuation, but that’s not what was agreed on and executed,” Canton said.

He said the agreement reached, that vulnerable adults would leave and voluntary evacuations would be done in some areas, “obviously worked.”

Mahoney said Fargo already was in the process of evacuating vulnerable individuals before the meeting with state and federal officials.

He said that move apparently prompted someone to “pull the trigger” on a larger-scale evacuation, because parts of interstates 29 and 94 were closed Friday, the day before the Red River crested in Fargo at 40.82 feet.

Mahoney said he called the governor’s office about the highway closings and was told the matter would be fixed.

And it was, said Lance Gaebe, the governor’s deputy chief of staff.

Gaebe said the interstate shutdown was the result of a glitch in communication between emergency management officials and the department of transportation.

“They basically said to prepare to put out an announcement in case we need to do this, and it got released as if it were happening,” Gaebe said.

Fargo Forum

So now not only is it clear the Governor's people were incompetent in handling the disaster emergency announcement, but it's also clear they lied about what was going on behind closed doors in Fargo.  They claimed an agreement was reached, during the meeting, to evacuate vulnerable folks, even though the City's plan to do that was already in motion BEFORE the meeting. 

We're in the middle of dealing with a disaster.  This is not the time to lie to the media.  This is not the time to lie to the public.

And why was this meeting taking place "behind closed doors?"  Don't we have an "open meetings" law here in North Dakota? Maybe the "closed meeting" status can be excused because we were in the middle of an emergency, but I'd like to think a record of the meeting was made so future administrators can learn from these clear mistakes made by Governor Hoeven and his staff.

Bismarck Tribune editor John Irby took after Congressman Earl Pomeroy in an editorial last week.  He was critical of Pomeroy because Pomeroy was expressing his passionate disgust with the bonuses being paid to AIG employees.  Pomeroy was expressing the disgust most of us felt and feel about the AIG bonuses, but Irby perhaps thought Pomeroy should sit on his hands.  I'm kind of glad Pomeroy spoke his mind.

It's interesting that the Fargo Forum has an editorial that talks about the pressure put on Fargo's mayor by FEMA suggesting the possible evacuation of the city, but the editorial doesn't mention -- at all -- the pressure from the Forum's publisher's best friend, Hoeven, or the lies Hoeven's office told to the media and to the people.  Gosh, I wonder why.  Maybe they're next door neighbors.

I'm waiting to see whether the Tribune's Irby has the stones to write a piece critical of the Governor's attempts to force the evacuation of Fargo and the DES screw-ups for which Hoeven is ultimately responsible.  I'm anxious to see Irby criticize the Governor and his staff for lying to the public and to the media during these crises.  If Irby does, it will be the first thing he's ever written that's been critical of Governor John Hoeven (R).

I'm sure he'll find a way to blame it all on Pomeroy, Conrad and/or Dorgan.

 
North Dakota Flood News and Info Aggregator Part 8
Written by Staff   

KFGO Fargo Live Radio Stream

**********

 Cass County Flood Info Center, click here

*********

City of Fargo Flood Info, click here 

*********

Support the Fargo Red Cross

 **********

National Weather Service River Level Graphic

**********

24 Hour Fargo Volunteer Hotline

701-476-4000

This is part VII of the North Dakota flood news aggregator.  Click on these links for Part I (Tuesday), Part II (Wednesday), Part III (Thursday), Part IV (Friday), Part V (Saturday), Part VI (Sunday), Part VII (Monday) and Part VIII (Tuesday).   There are lots of photos and video on Parts I, II, III, IV, V, VI and VII.  I'm putting the NEWEST ENTRIES AT THE TOP.

44.  ABC news -- Squirrel saved from swollen Red River (with video)

43.  MinnPost.com -- Who's the floodiest of them all?

42.  Minnesota Public Radio -- One family's fight against the flood

41.  City Pages -- Fargo Flood: Finding some depth markers

40.  Herald-Zeitung.com (AP) -- Red River recedes below most sandbags in Fargo

39.  Huffington Post -- Reminder: Don't mess with Mother Nature.  She has a long memory and a nasty temper.

38.  Minneapolis Star Tribune -- Fargo poised to try to get back to normal Wednesday

37.  NBC -- Fargo Mayor on flooding fears (March 30)

35.  YouTube -- Jacer -- This is my news story i did for class. its on the flooding in the Fargo, Moorhead area. Its my best newspiece in my opinion and i hope you all enjoy it

34.   iReport -- Stir Crazy (they played the audio of this on KFGO a while ago]

33.  Minnesota Public Radio -- For Fargo journalists, the flood story is personal (featuring KFGO and Joel Heitkamp)

32.  Dakota Student -- Flying over the flood: The DS got inside a National Guard Blackhawk helicopter to view the Fargo flood

31.  Grand Forks Herald -- Red crest [in GF] lowered, expected Thursday

30.  Monsters and Critics -- In photos:  "USA Weather - Red River flooding"

29.  Grand Forks Herald -- Flood-related power outages hit area; helicopter rescue

28.  Fargo Forum -- FLOOD UPDATE:  Moorhead could lift last evacuation order by tomorrow; mayor urges residents to leave dikes alone

27.  KXMB.com (AP) -- Fargo zoo takes pet boas, parrots during floods

26.  Examiner.com -- UMCOR assists in Red River flooding

25.  Farm & Ranch Guide -- NDSU offers flood salvage tips

24.  Fargo Forum -- FLOOD UPDATE:  Bethany residents begin to return Thursday

23.  Seattle Times -- Midwest flooding (photos)

22.  Jewish Journal -- Red River's embattled neighbors find hope in faith

21.  Minnesota Public Radio -- Guard soldiers fight flood close to home

20.  The Pilot (Boston) -- North Dakota bishop praises schools, parishes for flood preparations

19.  Fort Mill Times (S.C.) -- Red River flooding at a glance

18.  KEYC (Mankato, MN) -- Strengthening winds adding strain on levees in Fargo

17.  Associated Press (Google) -- Flood dampens North Dakota's economic success

16.  Epoch Times -- Local tells of Fargo flood

15.  The Journal of Commerce -- Flood, snow curb North Dakota freight

14.  PitchEngine -- Amidst disaster, a blessing

13.  Dakota Student -- The 2009 Flood Fight

12.  Christian Post -- Residents keep eye out for more Red River threat

11.  Reuters -- Snow and floods threaten North Dakota cattle herd

10.  YouTube -- Conrad briefs senate on NDs flood forecast

9.  The Daily Show

The Daily Show With Jon StewartM - Th 11p / 10c
CNN - Stop the Press
comedycentral.com
Daily Show Full EpisodesEconomic CrisisPolitical Humor

8.  WHBF-TV (AP) -- River's dropping, dikes are holding, stomr is almost over

7.  Morris Sun Tribune (Minn.) -- Red River surge expected at Fargo after blizzard

6.  EquiSearch -- Blog: You know you're from North Dakota when...

5.  MinnPost.com -- Flood update

4.  BusinesWire -- Target responds to Red River Valley community

3.  Jamestown Sun -- City [of Jamestown] to provide bags, sand

2.  Bismarck Tribune -- Travelers trying to escape storm

1.  Associated Press (Google) -- Wind and snow building again in flood-weary Fargo

 
North Dakota Flood News and Info Aggregator Part 7
Written by Staff   

KFGO Fargo Live Radio Stream

**********

 Cass County Flood Info Center, click here

*********

City of Fargo Flood Info, click here 

*********

Support the Fargo Red Cross

 **********

National Weather Service River Level Graphic

**********

24 Hour Fargo Volunteer Hotline

701-476-4000

This is part VII of the North Dakota flood news aggregator.  Click on these links for Part I (Tuesday), Part II (Wednesday), Part III (Thursday), Part IV (Friday), Part V (Saturday), Part VI (Sunday), Part VII (Monday) and Part VIII (Tuesday).  There are lots of photos and video on Parts I, II, III, IV, V and VI.  I'm putting the NEWEST ENTRIES AT THE TOP.

150.  Marshall Independent (MN) -- Joining Fargo's fight

149.  Minot Daily News -- The run-off run-up: Area prepares for flood threat; record flooding likely downstream

148.  VerticalMag.com -- Coast Guard Red River rescues reaches [sic] 93

147.  KansasCity.com -- Pro-Con: Does climate change play a role in Red River flooding?

146.  Winston-Salem Journal (AP) -- Everyone pitches in to help neighbors in flood

145.  Grand Forks Herald -- Mayor declares voluntary evacuation in Pembina

144.  KXMB TV -- Fargo's West Acres re-opens

143.  Fargo Forum -- Mid-March warmth kick-started all our flooding problems

142.  Fargo Forum -- Reassurance, calm can help children cope with flood

141.  Fargo Forum -- Forum Editorial:  The small deeds tell the story

140.  Fargo Forum -- Emergency food pantry needs food donations

139.  Dickinson Press -- N.D. Adjutant General tells lawmakers flooding is "epic"

138.  TampaBay.com -- In Fargo, outpouring of kindness comforts flooding victims

137.  Grand Forks Herald -- Flooding wins support for Waffle Plan

136.  Grand Forks Herald -- Familiar face of flood coverage

135.  The Daily Republic (Mitchell, SD) -- Flooding notebook: Watching a crack in the dirt

134.  AM1500.com (KSTP, St. Paul, MN) --  Flooding notebook: Watching a crack in the dirt

133.  NY Times -- Editorial: Fargo's Flood

132.  MinnPost.com -- The Star Tribune floods the zone

131.  Grand Forks Herald -- Officials stand behind GF floodwall, levee design

130.  PicasaWeb Photo Galleries

Monte's Moorhead flood fight pictures

Monte's Bismarck Sandbagging pictures

129.  YouTube -- Why your Bismarck Tribune was late today (and possibly why I didn't ever get my copy) (or maybe they just hate me)

128. YouTube --North Dakota Governor John Hoeven and other politicians take time out from their busy schedules during the Fargo flood to make a commercial for State Farm Insurance Company

127.  Fargo/Moorhead Flood 2009 -- Turtle and [Julian] went to Fargo/Moorhead to check out the flood and help sandbag.

126.  YouNews Update (YouTube) --Fargo, North Dakota Flooding 2009 HD

125.  ND National Guard (YouTube) -- lots of video of the National Guard in action in the flood fight

124. CorpsConnection (YouTube) --

123.  Chicago Tribune -- Red River threat draws reporter home to help out

122.  Canada.com -- River rising again as Fargo faces second crest [Editor:  the information in this story seems to conflict with the information at the National Weather Service's website, which doesn't show the river rising.]

121.  NY Times -- A river prone to flooding, and misunderstanding

120.  KXMC.com -- Willow Creek spills over banks [near Willow City, ND]

119.  Grand Forks Herald -- Help pours into Hendrum, Perley

118.  ChannelWeb -- North Dakota flood threat recedes, but VAR memains vigilant

117.  KXMB.com -- Blizzard in Bismarck

116.  KXMB.com -- Guard briefing on the floods

115.  KXMB.com -- Flood damage assistance

114.  The Atlantic (Andrew Sullivan: The Daily Dish) -- Faces of the day

113.  KXMC -- Ward County (Minot, ND, area) to begin Sandbagging

112.  Grand Forks Herald -- Hendrum, Minn., races to save city

111.  KEYC.com (Mankato, MN) -- Snow storm brings new concerns for Fargo residents

110.  Grand Forks Herald -- GF Mayor:  Stay off dikes or it'll cost ya

109.  Grand Forks Herald -- Ice jams:  There's "no silver bullet"

108.  Week.com -- YN Update:  North Dakota flooding 2009 (with video)

107.  Grand Forks Herald -- Winter weather

106.  StLToday.com (St. Louis, MO) -- River drops; Fargo still in peril

105.  Grand Forks Herald -- FLOOD UPDATES:  Notices, cancellations

104.  Minn. Public Radio -- Will the dikes hold up against the storm?

103.  Northland News Center (Duluth, MN) -- Northlanders help out with disaster relief in Fargo

102.  Sioux Falls Argus Leader -- Newborn babies flown from Fargo to Avera McKennan as flood persists

101.  Minneapolis Star Tribune -- First flood baby arrives in Fargo amid the chaos

100.  Flickr Photo Galleries

American Red Cross

U.S. Coast Guard

Percyw1947

Spring Nextel

Timothy Bungert

Mark & Carol

District 8 Photos

Minnesota Public Radio

Roofer 1

Post.ndakota

Sheldon&Kelly

Nathan L

Orfield Photography

Steven Travers

Blickdicht

TomInAlaska

Lori Zemke

BPieper

WilliamsJane11

hpyflyboy

medium121

99.  PicasaWeb Photo Galleries

Mark

Tom

Peder

Victoria Misslin

Kim

MATF1

98.  Dickinson Press -- Mayor wears Fighting Sioux cap as apology

97.  WaterTechOnline.com -- In North Dakota flood, water conservation urged

96.  ForestLakeTimes.com (MN) -- Sandbagging 101 is a hard lesson for FL grads

95.  ND National Guard (YouTube) -- South Dakota Army National Guard Soldiers activated to assist the North Dakota National Guard with flood-fighting efforts in Fargo use plastic sheeting to cover dikes in the area. A blizzard is moving in, and strong winds from the northeast work damaging the dikes. The plastic is an additional protective measure. (By videographer Master Sgt. Eric Johnson, 119th Wing, North Dakota Air National Guard)

94. Maxi with Concordia football team (YouTube) -- The team went up to Fargo to help fill sandbags and Mike Max talks to them about their experience.

93. Fargo Flood 2009 (YouTube) -- A little slide show dedicated to everyone involved in the efforts pertaining to the flood of 2009

92.  WCCO (YouTube) -- From a plane over Fargo-Moorhead, you get a good view of the extent of the Red River Floods.

91.  flood (YouTube) -- sindeevee

90.  WCCO (YouTube) -- John Wanamaker reporting from Fargo

89.  NY Times -- Snow could complicate flood recovery

88.  Associated Press -- Winter storm latest test for Fargo's levees

87.  Coast Guard Flood Rescues (YouTube) --  Coast Guard crews responding to the massive flooding in North Dakota have been busy rescuing stranded residents. To date, the Coast Guard has rescued 93 people. See more DoD videos athttp://dodvclips.mil

86. 2009 Fargo/Moorhead Flood (YouTube) --  Flight over Fargo/Moorhead on 3/28/09

85.  EV helps with Sandbagging 1 (YouTube) --  Eagle Valley (Minnesota) students and staff help with sandbagging efforts in Fargo. (Part 1

84.  Fargo Flood Report 3/30/09 10 am (YouTube) --

83.  Fargo Flood 2009 (YouTube) -- 

82.  Fargo Forum -- Oak Grove continues clean-up, meets with FEMA

81.  Jamestown Sun (AP) -- Blizzard puts ND legislature in limbo

80.  DL-Online -- Locals stand ready to help if needed

79.  Fargo Forum -- FLOOD UPDATE:  2nd Red River crest could hit 37 feet or higher in Fargo-Moorhead

78.  Associated Press (Google) -- In Fargo, goodwill runs as deep as the Red River

77.  Bleacher Report -- NFL hopeful affected by rising Red River

76.  Denver Post -- Fargo mayor:  Beating river, losing funding

75.  NWS -- Bismarck has 15.6 inches of snow accumulation as of 3 p.m. today.  Current winter's snowfall (98.5 inches) is on pace to break all-time winter snowfall record (101.6 inches). 

74.  Everyday Christian -- Blogs: Fargo unites in prayer during struggle with flood

73.  MN Public Radio -- Fargo's Mayor in spotlight (with audio)

72.  Northfield News (MN) --  EMS sends help to flood ravaged region

71.  Grand Forks Herald -- WEEKLY DNR CONSERVATION OFFICERS' REPORT:  Fargo-Moorhead flood fight dominates week

70.  Minneapolis Star Tribune -- Editorial:  Floodwaters pay no heed to state line

69.  AgWeb -- The Goodnight Report for March 30, 2009

68.  Naples News (FL) -- BLOG:  Red Cross volunteers report from North Dakota

67.  Vicksburg Post (MS) -- "Normal" is a great word for river-watchers

66.  NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC -- Flood pictures:  Icy waters grip U.S. Midwest

65.  News-Leader.com (Springfield, MO) -- Convoy of hope seeks to aid N. Dakota flooding victims

64.  Grand Forks Herald -- Capitol closed, legislature may skip Tuesday work

63.  Jamestown Sun -- Mail delivery hampered in the Dakotas

62.  Nick.com -- Flood damages Fargo school, but Red River is receding

61.  KARE-11 (Twin Cities) -- ND Guard commander expects second Red River crest

60.  National Guard -- Six states send troops to flood duty in North Dakota

59.  Construction & Maintenance -- Bobcat Company and record flooding

58.  DesmogBlog -- Reporters miss the boat (again) on Fargo flood, fail to mention it fits global warming trends

57.  Calgary Herald (Canada) -- Rural flood victims struggle as efforts focus on Fargo

56.  Associated Press (Google) -- New snowstorm hammers Northern Plains states

55.  Grand Forks Herald -- More snow, winds part of advisory for GF, EGF, part of northern valley

54.  Crookston Times --  Flood/weather update:  March living up to its reputation 

53.  CJOB (Manitoba) -- "Stable" is good 

52.  Imperial Valley News -- Customs and Border Patrol provides support in 2009 Red River Valley flood fight

51.  Star-Telegram.com -- Sit and stay:  Pets wait out ND flood in shelters

50.  BlueRidgeNow.com -- Neighbors joined for a battle not all would win

49.  Minneapolis Star Tribune -- Fargo works to protect good water from the bad

48.  It's Getting Hot In Here -- Is "Washington" winning?

47.  Associated Press (Google) -- Flooding in Fargo eases but winter storm moves in

46.  Jamestown Sun -- State offices closing due to blizzard

45.  TransWorldNews -- Blizzard bears down on flood victims and workers

44.  KGAN.com (Cedar Rapids, IA) -- Winds are the new worry in Fargo area

43.  Total Outdoor Network -- Lake Tschida (Western N.D.) flood photos from March 23, 2009

 Tschida

Tschida

Tschida

Tschida

Tschida

Tschida

42.  YouTube (DODvClips)--Flood levels in North Dakota begin to drop but forecasters say the waters remain at record high levels and days of work remain ahead. See more DoD videos at http://dodvclips.mil

41.  YouTube (Associated Press) -- U.S. Sen. Byron Dorgan of North Dakota talks about preparations as residents of Fargo brace for a record flood. (March 27)

40.  YouTube (USA Today)

39.  YouTube (PenderPat)

38.  YouTube (Coast Guard)

37.  YouTube (USGS)

36.  YouTube (Salvation Army)

35.  Disaster News Network -- Storms damage homes across U.S.

34.  AFP (Google) -- Blizzard bears down on flooded North Dakota

33.  USA Today -- Southwest, central N.D. hit by blizzard conditions

32.  LA Times -- Fargo city officials see flood threat easing (with AP video)

31.  The Street -- Need for flood insurance hits home

30.  ClaimsJournal -- Fire, flood devastate Minnesota town north of Fargo

29.  MarketWatch -- N.D. residents urged to prepare for storm

28.  YouTube (leehoedl) (March 25) (nearly 75,000 views)

27.  Environment News Service -- Floods, ice james, blizzards [Oh My!!!] strike the Great Plains

26.  Gazetteonline.com (Cedar Rapids, IA) -- Grand Forks is calm behind $417 million levee system

25.  PR Newswire -- Kimberly-Clark professional donates supplies to assist Fargo, ND, in Red River flood cleanup efforts

24.  KXMC.com (AP) -- ND Guard commander briefing lawmakers on flood

23.  Fargo Forum -- FLOOD UPDATE:  City looks at transition from "high alert" to "alert" status as Red falls

22.  Minneapolis Star Tribune -- Downstream towns mount their defenses

21.  Minneapolis Star Tribune -- Blizzard-like conditions could accompany storm

20.  Bloomberg -- Fargo builds sandbag reserve after record floodwaters (Update1)

19.  Green Bay Press  Gazette -- Flooding along the Midwest's Red River (photo gallery)

18.  Fargo Forum -- Wagner:  Storylines of flood inspire, motivate

17.  ClimateChangeCorp -- North Dakota floods threaten Fargo and captivates us

16.  Associated Press -- Flooding in Fargo eases but winter storm moves in

15.  Minneapolis Star Tribune -- Fargo to suspend sandbagging effort

14.  NewsroomAmerica -- Levees at Fargo holding

13.  Minneapolis City Pages -- How you can help Red River flood victims

12.  The Chronicle of Higher Education -- North Dakota and Minnesota Colleges Cancel Classes as Flood Worries Linger

11.  WKBT TV (YouTube) (WI) --  Three members of the Scenic Bluffs Chapter of the Red Cross head out Saturday to help

10.   Coast Guard (YouTube) -- FARGO AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE, N.D. Petty Officer 3rd Class Brandon Nowiki, from Coast Guard Air Station New Orleans, speaks about being deployed to the Red River Valley flood March 28, 2009. Two HH-65 Dolphin helicopter crews from Traverse City, Mich., and one from New Orleans deployed to North Dakota in response to the floods. Working with state and local agencies, helicopter crews have conducted numerous rescues throughout the city of Fargo and the surrounding communities. (U.S. Coast Guard video/Petty Officer 3rd Class Erik Swanson)

9.  Associated Press (YouTube) --  The Red River breached a dike Sunday and sent water flowing into buildings at a school campus in Fargo in an episode the mayor called a "wakeup call" for a city that needs to be vigilant for weaknesses in levees. (March 29)

8.   Associated Press (YouTube) -- Fargo's fears of a catastrophic flood eased Saturday with word that the Red River apparently crested at lower-than-expected levels, but residents still have much to worry about.(March 28)

7.  Associated Press (YouTube)-- Not even a record flood can stop love. Nathan and Brittany Aakre said their vows Saturday in Fargo, North Dakota, surrounded by friends, family and a whole lot of water. (March 28)

6.  YouTube (FEMA)

5.  YouTube (lolohAce24)

4.  YouTube (Whitcavy)

3.  Associated Press (YouTube)

2.  Red River Flooding 2009 -- Aerial video shot from a private plane over Fargo/Moorhead

1.  Fargo Flood 2009 -- County Road 17, near (is?) the Sheyenne River

 

Click on these links for Part I (Tuesday), Part II (Wednesday), Part III (Thursday), Part IV (Friday), Part V (Saturday), Part VI (Sunday), Part VII (Monday) and Part VIII (Tuesday).

 
Bismarck Legislator Dave Weiler Arrested
Written by Chet   

WeilerUPDATED MARCH 12, 2010, AT THE END OF THIS BLOG POST

Representative Dave Weiler (R-Bismarck) was arrested over the weekend.  The only media carrying the story so far today is KFYR television.  Here's the story.

A North Dakota lawmaker is out on bond after being arrested this weekend. State Representative Dave Weiler was arrested early Saturday morning after police say he pushed down his wife in their driveway. Weiler was arrested for simple assault domestic violence, a misdemeanor. His wife had minor injuries. Weiler is a Republican who represents District 30 in Bismarck.

KFYRTV.com

Weiler, you will recall, is the realtor/legislator who originally sponsored the 2007 bill that would have caused the State of North Dakota to sell the Missouri River Correctional Center land south of Bismarck and turned it into a bunch of McMansions.  Imagine how under water those McHomes would have been if they'd been developed over the past two years.

Thank goodness cooler heads prevailed two years ago.

UPDATE:  Weiler was arrested again on March 12, 2010, and is accused of assaulting his wife again.  For more on that, click here.

 
<< Start < 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 159 > End >>

Page 159 of 253